The Herniabible Blog

advice from people who have had an inguinal hernia

Loss of Orgasm After Groin Hernia Surgery

This report comes from one of our survey respondents

It’s now 365 days since my right inguinal hernia repair, open using mesh. From the morning after surgery there has been complete loss of orgasm and all erogenous/erotic feeling. The doctors are in total denial. This happens more often than they care to admit. Apparently we need all the sensory nerves in order for the brain to produce the sexual high and orgasm. Pudendal and perineal nerves often yanked in removing hernia sac… pull a nerve 15% and it never comes back, except as pain. Iliohypogastric and ilioinguinal also contribute to sex feelings, especially if you are circumcised. If only I had known.

More details

During open inguinal hernia repair, the pubic tubercle is the bone landmark which surgeons use to tell how far to cut. Two centimeters in from this point is where the spermatic cord changes course and a finger is used to separate it from the floor. The hernia sac is a part of the interior lining enclosing the bowel that is forced out through the inguinal canal. Typically it adheres to the cord and must be cut free. The surgeon can only go those two centimeters before encountering the suspensory ligament of the penis.

This is a wide band that circles and encloses the penis very much like a ‘marital aid’ or constriction band. It is firmly attached to the pubic bone and is what makes an erection point up and supports it for sex. It also helps the veins close off to maintain the erection.

The penile dorsal nerves lie under this sheath and are also exposed in the area inside before the penis enters the encircling ligament. If the surgeon pokes through this area in any of the three steps (exposing the cord, dissecting the sac, or suturing the mesh to the pubic tubercle) you can end up neutered like I was. If the suture ties into the ligament you can get the often-described-but-never-explained loss of firm erections, or often described ejaculatory or erection pain.

In my State medical malpractice claims have been legislated out of existance in the name of tort reform. I cannot be fixed, there is no way to protect yourself from incompetent surgery, and no way to make the doctor pay. Lack of informed consent likewise does not exist as a legal barrier.
I CAN’T URGE TOO STRONGLY TO ANYONE CONSIDERING THIS “ROUTINE MINOR SURGERY” TO THINK AGAIN!

If you had inguinal hernia surgery more than a year ago, please consider filling in our anonymous online survey.

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June 16, 2009 Posted by | Case reports, Surgery issues | , , , , , , , | 11 Comments

Anthony: A Hernia Cure

Aged 60, Anthony, who worked as a mowing contractor, decided in March 2008 that it was time to get fit again. He renewed his gym subscription and started back on weights. Shortly after trying to bench 100 kg for the first time in 15 years, he developed a pain in his right groin, which was diagnosed as an inguinal hernia. Anthony’s doctor booked him in for hernia repair surgery, which was to be carried out in September.

While awaiting surgery, Anthony consulted a homeopath and osteopath. He was treated with constitutional remedies, and also drank horsetail tea (for silicon), took calc-fluor tissue salts and vitamin C. The osteopath gave Anthony simple exercises for strengthening his transverse abdominal muscles.

Anthony stopped all other forms of exercise, gave up his mowing job, and avoided stretching and lifting anything heavier than 2-3 kilos for about three months. He ordered a hernia support garment (the “Flat Pad Support”) to help keep the hernia in and prevent it from getting worse.

When the hernia first appeared, it would pop out 10 times a day, just from walking around or standing in the shower. This stopped when Anthony started wearing the support garment and ceased all aggravating activity. But in May it emerged again when he tried doing some push-ups without wearing the support, so he went back to wearing it for a couple of hours a day.

By June the hernia appeared to be under control, and Anthony felt confident enough to start doing some mild aerobic exercises and strength training at home. He also began doing some work on his tractor which involved a certain amount of straining. When doing these activities Anthony wore his hernia support, which he found gave him a feeling of security and took much of the tentativeness out of his daily activities.

By September the hernia had improved so much that Anthony postponed the surgery for three months. To check that the hernia really had gone, he went for an ultrasound examination. This showed that nothing remained but a small enlargement of the deep end of the inguinal canal. The doctor asked him to strain as hard as he could; this forced just a small amount of fat into the deep end, but no bowel, and there was no protrusion.

Within a month Anthony was regularly carrying 20 kg water bottles around and lifting heavy pumps into the back of his truck, without any problems at all.

Anthony believes that all his therapies helped his hernia to heal, aided by his hernia support which kept the hernia in, giving the rupture a chance to heal. A devoted Christian, he also believed that prayer played a key role.

View Anthony’s postings on E-health

Report your own hernia cure, or view more cure reports on the Herniabible forum
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April 15, 2009 Posted by | Case reports | , , , , | 2 Comments

Getting A Hernia To Go Back In

Keeping a hernia in is very important, but the longer it has been “out” the more difficult it may be to push it back in. This is possibly because the discomfort causes chronic muscular tension in the area. The following case reports might help you if you have this problem.

BTDT’s story
One of our forum members, “BTDT” found that whether he wore a hernia support or not, a lot of heat seemed to build up in the groin area. Both the heat and the hernia bulge would subside whenever he temporarily stopped eating solid food and just drank vegetable juices.

When BTDT lost his job he decided to go on unemployment and have a rest. Almost immediately his life became much less stressful.

Next he tried an experiment with his hernia. As heat would still build up in the area when he ate solid food, BTDT started to put cloths soaked in cold water over his groin area before going to sleep. This cooled down the area straight away and when he woke up in the morning, he felt much more refreshed and almost forgot he had a hernia.

This worked so well that two or three times a week he would also hold something cold against the hernia, for instance a cold drinks can or a plastic water bottle that had been kept in the fridge.

After three months the hernia had completely disappeared. As BTDT says, he did nothing else to get rid of it except rest and relaxation, removal of the heat, and less solid food to place strain on the area.

BTDT believes that maybe the heat from the hernia was keeping the muscles soft and weak so they couldn’t tighten up and allow the abdominal wall to grow back together.

SD’s story
SD had had his hernia for at least 20 years. “Usual thing left hand always in pocket or ready for any instant physical effort the moment it starts to bulge.” He wasn’t too concerned as he was always able to push it back in ok.

But SD had a couple of scary moments when the hernia would not go back in for up to a minute. Afraid it would descend into the sac he immediately lay down on the bed on his back, hips in the air and with knees fully bent. Using all the physical effort he could muster he eventually managed to stuff it all back in.

SD was a workaholic with shredded nerves and difficulty sleeping. Shopping one day in the supermarket and wanting to buy some washing up liquid, he found himself staring at it on the shelf yet completely unable to know what to do next. “Add to that both hands were holding the hernia in like crazy, I was really desperate to pay up (with one hand) and rush back to the car!!” he says.

Fortunately SD’s work schedule dwindled and one day when he had been reading a really interesting book for two or three hours, he suddenly noticed he felt very relaxed indeed and that the hernia had gone in by itself.

“It was the feeling of deep relaxation that struck me most of all. That evening I started to think a lot more about it and although I had a fair bit to do the next day, I decided as an experiment to drop everything and force myself to spend the day reading to see if it would happen again. But I found this extremely irritating and very difficult as I couldn’t concentrate on the story at all. I kept wanting to rush off to do whatever I’d planned originally, none of which fortunately was all that important. Eventually after about half an hour I managed to become interested and get back into the story once more, finally spending the whole day having a good old long and relaxing read. Again the hernia had vanished!”

“It’s still early days, but it does seem, for me anyway, that stress must somehow be involved somewhere, and that doing something that is naturally relaxing might seem to be a possible cure and answer. I’ve since found that when I get worked up about something the hernia goes back into its old “semi-bulge” position. Not too much of a problem but always with my left hand immediately ready to push it back in just in case. I’m finding it doesn’t work to rush around and then try to find a moment to “de-stress”. The most effective approach seems to be to somehow hang on to the most relaxed and earliest moments of the day – throughout the whole of the day. Or at least for as long as possible.”


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April 7, 2009 Posted by | Keeping hernia in | | 9 Comments